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Friday
Sep102010

New York Becomes Second State to Propose Bill Banning Tail Docking in Cattle

(This may be a little late on the news front, but still worth knowing)

By: Erin Lashnits

Cornell University, Class of 2012

A bill to prohibit tail docking in cattle was introduced in the New York State Assembly in January. 

     This ban comes on the heals of a recent report by ABC Nightline, in which a video recorded by the animal rights group Mercy for Animals showed tail docking and dehorning, as well as sick and injured cows, excessively dirty living conditions, and improper handling of cattle.  The video was recorded during an undercover investigation of a 5,000 head New York dairy farm.  The segment also included a heavily edited interview with Chris Galen, the National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) spokesperson, but did not show footage of other farm sources provided to ABC by Dairy Management, Inc.

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Tuesday
Sep072010

NAVMEC (round 3)

By: Stephanie Silberstang

Cornell University

NAVMECThe North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium (NAVMEC) was started by the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC) in order to keep veterinarians up to speed with the changing needs of society through discussion of education models, accreditation and licensing (http://www.aavmc.org/navmec.htm). This consortium includes over 200 groups and organizations interested in changing, supporting and improving veterinary education that will send a representative to the 3 national meetings in 2010 to discuss how veterinary medicine can evolve with society.

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Sunday
Sep052010

Dreams Vs. Memories

By: Matthew Inniss

Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine, Class of 2014

 

Your thoughts have drifted into a state of blankness

The thought of yesterdays seem to have slipped into an unknown past.

But, every so often one of those thoughts appears for a short time,

As if to start us on an unbeaten path;

These constellations of the mind heart, and spirit

Creations of heaven, memories of a life of living,

 

What will I do, years from now?

What do I inspire within hearts, to reach for higher ground to find true destiny of which truth is spoken?

These words come to me as visions of rainbows and sunshine filled days, where children of perfection play amongst the clouds.

 

You gawk at these words only because you have yet to believe in yourself.

You think it not possible for man to be eternal, but I pray, tell that it is true that he is

Those of you who believe and dream, continue to run the race life will course.

Hold thy friends steady at thy side and no Tundra or Mountain will blind your sight of the true being within us all.

 

Save yourself pain, and let yourself be free.

Dreams have provided you with hope, and memories the ammunition to fight the battles that may come your way.

Arm thyself properly, and life will be yours.

Thursday
Sep022010

Native American Project HSVMA Stipend

By: Angela Snell

Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Class of 2011

Just before beginning my clinical year at Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, I spent a week with the Humane Society Field Services at two Native American reservations in Nevada.As part of a team of veterinarians, technicians, and veterinary students, I worked long days to provide veterinary services to as many animals as possible. Two of my days were spent receiving people’s pets for vaccinations and/or surgery. The people I met were very appreciative that we were there to care for their animals. One man brought in his cat who had injured her paw a few days before, and was now lame and had a fever. Although he was primarily interested in having her spayed, he showed concern about her tender paw and let us investigate her lameness and fever.  We found some bite wounds on her leg, started her on antibiotics, and after just one night at the clinic she was bearing weight on her leg again. After two days, she was ready to be spayed and the owner was very pleased that we were able to provide her with such good care.

While I was on the reservation, I was also able to take one morning away from the clinic to talk to a class at the local high school. I spent an hour with animal science students and we discussed a variety of topics, including the reasons why a pet should be seen by a veterinarian. When I asked this question, I was surprised when the first response was “to kill it,” and I realized that a discussion about euthanasia was in order. I talked about when veterinarians tend to feel that it is an appropriate decision and a little about how it is accomplished. I talked about the animal losing consciousness and therefore not feeling pain during the euthanasia. The students were intrigued. I believe the students enjoyed the talk and learned about the field of veterinary medicine. It was my first time speaking to students specifically about veterinary medicine, and after three years of study I felt I was able to share some interesting, and hopefully memorable, stories with them. I would like to thank the Native American Project (NAP) for reminding me of the importance of doing this type of outreach/education and for their financial support.

Monday
Aug302010

Tracking in Vet School (part 3)

By: Dayle Dillon

University of Illinois, Class of 2013

The University of Illinois has implemented a new curriculum that began with the class of 2013.  The most unique aspects of this curriculum are the exposure to clinics from day one, and the absence of traditional “tracking” during the fourth year of schooling.  Of course there will always be naysayers in any given situation but I feel that the new curriculum will prove to be quite successful as it allows for more instruction to take place in a true clinical environment, faced with situations a veterinarian encounters on a day to day basis. 

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